"Summer is icumen in, loudly sing cuckoo. Grows the seed and blows the mead, and springs the wood anew. Sing, cuckoo! Ewe bleats harshly after lamb, cows after calves make moo." - Wicker Man.
#439 | May 1, 2012
SFIFF 2012: Critic's Notebook
The 55th San Francisco International Film Festival continues through May 3rd, and Craig Phillips brings us this report on the action thus far. This Critic's Notebook dives into the distinctly deadpan feature debut of Lebanese filmmaker Rania Attieh and her American co-director Daniel Garcia OK, Enough, Goodbye; actor (Munich, Haywire) and director (Babylon A.D., Gothika) Mathieu Kassovitz's provocative and highly effective thriller Rebellion; and Manuel von Stürler's beautifully conceived Winter Nomads. Read more >>
In This Dispatch:
  • What's New: George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Haywire. 
  • What We're Watching: Cirkus Columbia.
  • Explore: TRIBECA 2012: Critic's Notebook #2, Retro Active: Web of the Spider. 
“I will never forget the first time I heard All Things Must Pass," said Martin Scorsese of his documentary subject George Harrison's triple solo 1970 album. “It was like walking into a cathedral. George was making spiritually awake music – we all heard and felt it.” Known commonly as the quiet Beatle, Scorsese takes an in-depth look at Harrison's life and spiritual journey through a plethora of never before seen footage and interviews from his closest compatriots. Clocking in at 210 minutes, it's a long sit, however, "That is the value of a film this long... we can observe and regard a full and complex life, and feel as though we understand it a touch better afterwards. This is a masterful film," writes Jason Bailey
george-harrison-material-world
Steven Soderbergh in box office mode is, as we've said before, nothing to sneeze at, so it comes as no surprise that his take on the spy-action-thriller is "streamlined, beautifully shot and casually thrilling...Haywire is about the simple joys of action film virtuosity, and Soderbergh delivers." says Vadim Rizov. The film stars MMA champ and American Gladiator Gina Carano as a covert ops specialist up against big-time male movie stars Ewan McGregor, Michael Fassbender, Channing Tatum, Antonio Banderas and Michael Douglas. Peter Travers adds, "Haywire comes close to achieving Soderbergh's goal of creating 'a Pam Grier movie made by Alfred Hitchcock.'" Also available on Blu-Ray
Haywire
Also out todayNew Year's Eve, Strip Strip Hooray! (compliation of 1950's Burlesque performances), and  Cirkus Columbia.

New and Coming Releases lists  | Your Queue | Discuss! | GreenCine's review blog: Guru | GC Member Reviews and Lists | New DVD Spotlight
What We're Watching

Cirkus Columbia
From Aaron Hillis: "In small-town southern Herzegovina circa 1992—on the eve of the bloody war in the Balkans—middle-age former villager Divko (Miki Manojlovic) rolls into town after 20 years of German exile in a shiny red Mercedes, with tons of dough and flame-haired arm candy Azra (Jelena Stupljanin). The communists are out of power, and Divko is ready to take back his family home—except that it's still occupied by his frumpy, abandoned wife, Lucija (Mira Furlan), and ham-radio-obsessed grown son, Martin (Boris Ler)." This straightfoward fractured family drama becomes, as  Diego Costa adds, "a very nuanced political critique of capital... (which) will, of course, unsettle systems of kinship as well."

Explore
Steve Dollar files Critic's Notebook #2 from this year's Tribeca Film Festival, covering the three-director omnibus with vaguely Dogme '95 overtones The Fourth Dimension (featuring works from Harmony Korine, Aleksei Fedorchenko, and Jan Kwiecinski), the The Norwegian Coen Brothers Knock-off Jackpot, and much, much more. Read more >>
TRIBECA 2012: Critic's Notebook #2
Inspired by the Edgar Allan Poe-themed horror-mystery The Raven, Nikc Schager brings us this Retro Active column on Italian Director Antonio Margheriti's Web of the Spider, a remake of Margheriti's own aptly-dubbed (and superior) 1964 Castle of Blood. With the incomparable Klaus Kinski as Edgar Allan Poe, Kinski opens the film flailing about a tomb with a torch in hand, lurching and spinning about with frantic, sweaty drunkenness, and smashing open a coffin before bellowing a hilarious "Noooooo!"  Read more >>
RETRO ACTIVE: Web of the Spider

May Day



Podcasts!


 
We recommend viewing this newsletter in all of its HTML glory; check your e-mail program's settings to view HTML. This newsletter is sent to GreenCine members only. If you do not wish to receive this newsletter in the future, log in to the GreenCine site, click "View Your Profile" then click Edit Profile. Choose "no" on the "Subscribe to the GreenCine newsletter" option and click "Update Profile." Archives of the Dispatch are now available online at GreenCine's Press and Marketing blog.